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Deep DIVE

Audit Compliance

We take a deep dive into 24+ key areas to fully understand the compliance levels of an organisation
compliance

Transport Compliance Audits

Legal Entity

Details accurate on Government websites, includes VOL and Companies House Checks.

A legal entity is a person or organisation that is recognised by law as having its own rights and responsibilities. In the UK, there are many different types of legal entities, including companies, partnerships, trusts, and charities.

The most common type of legal entity in the UK is a company. A company is a legal person that is separate from its owners. This means that a company can own property, enter into contracts, and sue or be sued in its own name. Companies are also subject to their own set of laws and regulations.

Another common type of legal entity in the UK is a partnership. A partnership is a business owned by two or more people. Partnerships are not separate legal entities from their owners, which means that the partners are personally liable for the debts and obligations of the partnership.

Checking the details as shown with the Companies House register, to check status of business, directors and changes allows us to verify the business entity.

Operating Centres

Evidence in support of Operating Centres, locations and number of vehicles per Centre.

An operating centre for a transport business in the UK is a place where goods vehicles are normally kept when not in use. It could be a depot, a warehouse, or even a customer's premises. When you apply for an operator's licence, you'll be asked to give the address of your proposed centre(s) and information about the numbers of trailers and vehicles you will keep there. You'll need to show that your operating centre:is large enough, has safe access, is in an environmentally acceptable location.

The Traffic Commissioner will need to be satisfied that your operating centre(s) are suitable before they will issue you with an operator's licence.There are a number of things you need to consider when choosing an operating centre, including:

  • The size of your fleet

  • The type of vehicles you operate

  • The location of your customers

  • The availability of parking

  • The cost of rent or lease

It's important to choose an operating centre that is both suitable for your needs and compliant with the regulations. If you're not sure where to start, you can get advice from the DVSA or a transport consultant.

PMI/ Maintenance

Availibility, Quality and Checks in place to ensure vehicles are roadworthy and safe.

Preventive maintenance inspections (PMIs) are a type of inspection that is done to identify potential problems with equipment before they cause a failure. PMIs are typically scheduled based on the manufacturer's recommendations or on the equipment's operating history.

There are many benefits to performing PMIs, including:

  • Preventing equipment failures

  • Reducing downtime

  • Increasing equipment life

  • Improving safety

  • Reducing costs

To perform a PMI, a technician will typically follow a checklist of items to inspect. The checklist may include items such as:

  • Checking for leaks

  • Checking for loose or damaged components

  • Checking for proper lubrication

  • Checking for proper electrical connections

  • Checking for proper alignment

If any problems are found during a PMI, the technician will typically take steps to correct the problem. This may involve repairing the equipment, replacing a part, or adjusting a setting.

PMIs are an important part of any equipment maintenance program. By performing regular PMIs, you can help to prevent equipment failures, reduce downtime, and increase the life of your equipment.

Click here for more about PMIs

Driver Walkarounds

Review the system in place for driver to perform walkarounds and report defects.

HGV driver walkarounds are a safety check that HGV drivers must carry out before each journey. The checks are designed to identify any potential problems with the vehicle that could make it unsafe to drive.

The checks cover the whole vehicle, including the trailer that the vehicle is towing. Drivers must carefully assess both interior and exterior items that can be safely assessed by the driver.

The checks that drivers must carry out include:

Tyre condition, Brake systems and components, Steering,Lamps, direction indicators, hazard warning lamps,Windscreen wipers and washers, Mirrors, Fuel and oil levels,  Bodywork, Trailer coupling, etc

If any problems are found during the walkaround, the driver must not drive the vehicle until the problems have been fixed. Drivers must also record the results of the walkaround and report any defects to their employer.

The DVSA (Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency) can stop HGV drivers to carry out checks on their vehicles. Drivers can be stopped from driving until they fix any problems that are found, or they can be issued with a fine.

Driver walkarounds are an important part of keeping HGVs safe on the road. By carrying out these checks, drivers can help to prevent accidents and keep themselves and others safe.

For a comprehensive list of things to check during a driver  walkaround click here.

Driver Defect Reporting

System in place to report defects and a closed loop that ensures they are fixed.

Driver defect reporting is the process of recording and reporting any defects found on a heavy goods vehicle (HGV) during a daily walkaround check. This is a legal requirement for all HGV drivers in the UK.

The purpose of driver defect reporting is to ensure that HGVs are safe to drive and that any defects are rectified as soon as possible. Defects that are not reported can pose a serious risk to the safety of the driver, other road users, and pedestrians.

Drivers must carry out a daily walkaround check of their HGV before they start their journey. This check should include looking for any obvious defects, such as:

  • Tyres that are worn or damaged

  • Lights that are not working

  • Brakes that are not working properly

  • Oil leaks

  • Damage to the bodywork

If any defects are found, the driver must report them to their employer or the person responsible for maintaining the HGV. The defect must also be recorded on a vehicle defect report form.

The driver must not drive the HGV until the defect has been rectified. If the defect is dangerous, the driver must stop the vehicle and not drive it until it is safe to do so.

Drivers who do not carry out daily walkaround checks or who do not report defects can be fined by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA). In some cases, drivers may also be disqualified from driving.

It is important for all HGV drivers to be aware of their responsibilities in relation to driver defect reporting. By carrying out daily walkaround checks and reporting any defects, drivers can help to keep themselves, other road users, and pedestrians safe.

Inspection Facilities

Review of maintenance facilities or contracts with third part service providers

The DVSA (Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency) is the UK government agency responsible for setting and enforcing standards for road vehicles and drivers. The DVSA issues guidelines for maintenance facilities for third parties or in house repairs, which are designed to ensure that all vehicles are maintained to a high standard and are safe to drive.

The guidelines cover a range of topics, including:

The facilities that must be available at a maintenance facility

The qualifications and experience of the staff who work at a maintenance facility

The procedures that must be followed when carrying out maintenance work

The records that must be kept by a maintenance facility

The guidelines are designed to help operators of maintenance facilities to ensure that they are meeting the required standards. They are also used by the DVSA to assess maintenance facilities during inspections.

If you are considering using a maintenance facility, it is important to check that they are following the DVSA guidelines. You can do this by asking the facility to show you their DVSA inspection report or by contacting the DVSA directly.

Here are some of the key points of the DVSA guidelines for maintenance facilities:

The facility must have adequate space to carry out maintenance work.

The facility must have the necessary equipment to carry out maintenance work.

The staff who work at the facility must be qualified and experienced to carry out maintenance work.

The facility must have procedures in place to ensure that maintenance work is carried out correctly.

The facility must keep records of all maintenance work that is carried out.

The DVSA guidelines are an important part of ensuring that all vehicles are maintained to a high standard and are safe to drive. If you are considering using a maintenance facility, it is important to check that they are following the DVSA guidelines.


Vehicle Emissions (AdBlue)

Review of systems to measure the fuel and AdBlue usage

AdBlue is a solution of urea and deionized water that is used to reduce emissions from diesel engines. It is a key component of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology, which is used in many HGV vehicles. SCR technology works by injecting AdBlue into the exhaust stream, where it reacts with nitrogen oxides (NOx) to form harmless nitrogen and water.

The use of AdBlue is important in the UK because it helps to reduce air pollution. NOx emissions are a major contributor to air pollution, and they can cause a range of health problems, including respiratory problems, heart disease, and cancer. By reducing NOx emissions, AdBlue helps to improve air quality and protect public health.

The use of AdBlue is also important in the UK because it helps to meet European Union emission standards. The EU has set strict emission standards for diesel vehicles, and AdBlue is a key technology for meeting these standards. By using AdBlue, HGV operators can help to ensure that their vehicles are compliant with EU emission standards.

The control of AdBlue is also important in the UK. AdBlue is a hazardous substance, and it is important to ensure that it is handled and stored safely. The UK government has set regulations for the handling and storage of AdBlue, and these regulations must be followed by all businesses that use AdBlue.

In conclusion, the usage and control of AdBlue in HGV vehicles is important in the UK because it helps to reduce air pollution, meet European Union emission standards, and ensure the safe handling and storage of AdBlue.

Wheel & Tyre Management

Effectiveness of the wheel security System and tyre management Policy

Here is a sample wheel and tyre policy for your HGVs:

Policy: All HGVs must have tyres that are in good condition and meet the legal requirements.

Responsibilities: The driver is responsible for checking the tyres of their HGV before each journey and reporting any problems to their supervisor. The supervisor is responsible for ensuring that all HGVs have safe and well-maintained tyres.

Procedures: The following procedures will be followed to ensure that all HGVs have safe and well-maintained tyres:

Drivers will check the tyres of their HGV before each journey and report any problems to their supervisor.

Supervisors will inspect the tyres of all HGVs on a regular basis and report any problems to the fleet manager.

The fleet manager will ensure that all HGVs have a regular maintenance schedule for their tyres.

The fleet manager will also ensure that all HGVs have the correct type and size of tyres.

Records: The following records will be kept:

  • A record of all tyre inspections.

  • A record of all tyre replacements & Re-torque

  • A record of all tyre maintenance.

This is just a sample policy and you may need to adapt it to meet the specific needs of your business.

Load Security

Review the operators load security practices

Here is a sample load security policy for your HGVs in the UK:

Introduction - This policy sets out the requirements for load security on all HGVs operated by [Company Name]. It is designed to ensure that all loads are carried safely and securely, in accordance with all applicable laws and regulations.

Responsibilities - The responsibility for load security rests with the driver. However, all employees involved in loading or unloading HGVs must be familiar with this policy and must take all necessary steps to ensure that loads are secured safely.

Load security procedures

  • All loads must be secured in accordance with the following procedures:

  • The load must be evenly distributed on the vehicle.

  • The load must be secured to the vehicle using appropriate load restraints.

  • The load must be checked to ensure that it is secure before the vehicle is driven.

Load restraint equipment - All load restraint equipment must be in good condition and must be used in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.

Training - All drivers and loading/unloading staff must be trained in load security procedures.

Inspections - All HGVs must be inspected regularly to ensure that they are in good condition and that load restraint equipment is in good working order.

Records - All load security inspections and checks must be recorded.

Compliance - All employees must comply with this policy. Any employee who fails to comply with this policy may be subject to disciplinary action.

Review - This policy will be reviewed annually to ensure that it remains effective.

Security

Site security and vehicle key management

Security and vehicle key management refers to the procedures and practices that are used to protect HGVs and their keys from unauthorized access and use. The DVSA (Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency) is the UK government agency responsible for regulating the driving and vehicle licensing system. The DVSA publishes guidelines on a variety of topics related to driving and vehicle safety, including security and vehicle key management.

The DVSA guidelines on security and vehicle key management recommend that employers take a number of steps to protect their vehicles and their keys, including:

  • Keeping keys in a secure location when not in use

  • Requiring employees to sign for keys when they are issued and returned

  • Rotating keys regularly

  • Using keyless entry systems where possible

  • Installing security alarms and tracking devices

  • Training employees on security procedures

The DVSA also recommends that employers carry out regular risk assessments to identify potential security threats and to ensure that appropriate security measures are in place.

The DVSA guidelines on security and vehicle key management are designed to help employers protect their vehicles and their keys from theft and unauthorized use. By following these guidelines, employers can help to reduce the risk of vehicle theft and to protect their employees from the consequences of vehicle theft.

Here are some additional tips for security and vehicle key management:

Keep keys in a locked cabinet or drawer when not in use.

Do not leave keys in an unlocked HGV, even if you are only going to be away for a few minutes.

Be careful when handing over keys to employees or contractors. Make sure that they are authorised to have the keys and that they understand the security procedures.

If you lose a key, change the locks on the vehicle as soon as possible.

Install security cameras and motion sensors around your business to deter thieves.

Train your employees on security procedures and make sure that they know what to do if they see something suspicious.

Training & Development

CPD for the operator, CPC Training and general driver training

CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development. It is a process of lifelong learning that helps professionals to maintain and develop their skills and knowledge. CPD is important for vehicle licence operators in the UK because it helps them to keep up with changes in the industry and to ensure that they are providing a high standard of service.

There are many different ways for vehicle licence operators to undertake CPD. They can attend training courses, read books and articles, or network with other professionals. CPD can also be informal, such as by reading industry news or talking to customers.

The amount of CPD that a vehicle licence operator needs to undertake will vary depending on their role and experience. However, most operators should aim to undertake at least 30 hours of CPD per year.

CPD can be a valuable way for vehicle licence operators to improve their skills and knowledge. It can also help them to stay up-to-date with changes in the industry and to provide a high standard of service.

Here are some examples of CPD activities that vehicle licence operators could undertake:

  • Attending training courses

  • Reading books and articles

  • Networking with other professionals

  • Attending conferences and seminars

  • Writing articles or blog posts or listening to Webinars

  • Giving presentations

  • Undertaking research projects

  • Mentoring others

CPC training stands for Driver Certificate of Professional Competence.

It is mandatory training for all HGV drivers in the UK. The training is designed to help drivers keep their skills and knowledge up to date, and to improve road safety. The training covers a range of topics, including driving theory, driving practice, and health and safety.

HGV drivers must complete 35 hours of CPC training every five years. The training can be taken in a variety of ways, including classroom-based courses, e-learning courses, and distance learning courses.

Drivers who do not complete the required CPC training may be fined up to £1,000. They may also be disqualified from driving HGVs.

There are a number of benefits to completing CPC training. The training can help drivers to:

  • Improve their driving skills

  • Stay up-to-date with the latest driving regulations

  • Reduce their risk of accidents

  • Improve their job prospects

If you are an HGV driver, it is important to make sure that you complete your CPC training. The training can help you to stay safe on the roads, and to improve your career prospects.

Driver Checks

Driver licence checks, Points and risk management

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is responsible for ensuring that drivers in the United Kingdom are safe and competent. They carry out a number of checks on drivers, including:

  • Checks on driving licenses to make sure they are valid and that the driver has the correct entitlement to drive the type of vehicle they are driving.

  • Checks on medical fitness to make sure the driver is fit to drive.

  • Checks on records of convictions and penalty points to make sure the driver is not disqualified from driving.

  • Checks on tachograph records to make sure the driver is not breaking rules on hours of work and rest.

  • Checks on vehicle safety to make sure the vehicle is roadworthy.

The DVSA also carries out roadside checks on drivers. These checks can be carried out at any time, and drivers can be stopped and asked to provide evidence of their identity, driving license, and vehicle insurance. The DVSA can also carry out checks on vehicles, including checking for defects, overloading, and illegal modifications.

If the DVSA finds any problems with a driver or their vehicle, they can take action, which could include:

  • Giving the driver a warning.

  • Imposing a penalty, such as a fine or points on their license.

  • Disqualifying the driver from driving.

  • Seizing the vehicle.

The DVSA is committed to keeping the roads safe, and their checks on drivers and vehicles help to achieve this. Drivers should be aware of the checks that the DVSA can carry out, and they should make sure that they are compliant with the law.

In addition to the checks carried out by the DVSA, there are a number of other checks that drivers should be aware of. These include:

  • Checks by employers. Employers may carry out checks on their drivers, such as checking their driving record and medical fitness.

  • Checks by insurance companies. Insurance companies may carry out checks on their drivers, such as checking their driving record and medical fitness.

  • Checks by other organisations. Other organisations, such as trade unions, may carry out checks on their members who are drivers.

Drivers should be aware of the checks that can be carried out on them, and they should make sure that they are compliant with the law.

Driver Hours

Driver & Vehicle card downloads and contingency planning

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) sets out the hours that HGV drivers can drive in a day and week. These rules are designed to ensure that drivers are not fatigued and that their safety and the safety of others is not compromised.

The best practice for managing driver hours is to use a digital tachograph. This is a device that records the driver's hours of work and rest. It can be used to plan journeys and ensure that drivers do not exceed the permitted hours.

Drivers should also take regular breaks. They should take a break of at least 45 minutes after driving for 4.5 hours. They should also take a break of at least 11 hours after driving for 14 hours.

It is important to note that the DVSA can carry out checks on drivers and their hours of work. If a driver is found to be in breach of the rules, they may be issued with a penalty.

Here are some of the best practices for managing driver hours for HGV drivers as per DVSA guidelines:

Use a digital tachograph to record your hours of work and rest.

Plan your journeys carefully to ensure that you do not exceed the permitted hours.

Take regular breaks, including a 45-minute break after driving for 4.5 hours and an 11-hour break after driving for 14 hours.

Be aware of the DVSA's rules on driver hours and be prepared to produce your tachograph records if asked to do so.

By following these best practices, you can help to ensure that you are compliant with the DVSA's rules and that you are driving safely.

Work Time Directive

Tachograph reporting and record keeping

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is the UK government agency responsible for regulating drivers, vehicles, and driving standards. The DVSA sets out best practice for managing work time for HGV drivers in its guidelines.

The DVSA guidelines recommend that HGV drivers should:

  • Keep a record of their work and rest times.

  • Take regular breaks.

  • Not drive for more than 9 hours in a day.

  • Take a break of at least 45 minutes after driving for 4.5 hours.

  • Not drive for more than 15 hours in a day plus a break of at least 9 hours.

  • Take a weekly rest period of at least 45 hours.

The DVSA also recommends that HGV drivers should:

  • Be aware of the signs of fatigue.

  • Avoid driving when they are tired.

  • Get enough sleep.

  • Eat a healthy diet.

  • Stay hydrated.

  • Take regular breaks.

  • Avoid alcohol and drugs.

The DVSA guidelines are designed to protect HGV drivers and other road users from the dangers of fatigue. By following these guidelines, HGV drivers can help to ensure that they are fit to drive and that they are not putting themselves or others at risk.

Here are some additional tips for managing work time for HGV drivers:

  • Plan your route carefully and allow plenty of time for breaks.

  • If you are feeling tired, pull over and take a break.

  • Do not drive when you are under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

  • Eat a healthy diet and drink plenty of fluids.

  • Get enough sleep.

  • Take regular breaks, even if you are not feeling tired.

  • Be aware of the signs of fatigue, such as yawning, difficulty concentrating, and irritability.

  • If you start to feel fatigued, pull over and take a break.

  • Do not drive if you are not fit to do so.

Previous Notices

Any previous actions on file

The Traffic Commissioner can issue a variety of notices to operators, depending on the circumstances. Some of the most common notices include:

Variation notice: This notice is issued when an operator wants to make a change to their operator's licence. For example, they might want to add a new vehicle to their fleet or change their operating area.

Variation with conditions notice: This notice is similar to a variation notice, but it includes conditions that the operator must meet in order to make the change. For example, the Traffic Commissioner might require the operator to carry out additional training or to install new equipment.

Suspension notice: This notice is issued when the Traffic Commissioner believes that the operator is no longer fit and proper to hold an operator's licence. This might be because the operator has committed serious offences or because they have failed to comply with the terms of their licence.

Revocation notice: This notice is issued when the Traffic Commissioner believes that the operator should no longer have an operator's licence. This might be because the operator has committed serious offences or because they have failed to comply with the terms of their licence on a number of occasions.

Directions notice: This notice is issued when the Traffic Commissioner wants the operator to take specific action. For example, they might direct the operator to carry out additional training or to install new equipment.

Improvement notice: This notice is issued when the Traffic Commissioner believes that the operator needs to improve their standards. For example, they might direct the operator to improve their maintenance procedures or to improve the way they deal with customer complaints.

Warning notice: This notice is issued when the Traffic Commissioner is concerned about the operator's standards, but they do not believe that it is necessary to take further action at this stage. The notice will usually set out what the operator needs to do to improve their standards.

The Traffic Commissioner can also issue a number of other notices, depending on the circumstances. For more information, please see the DVSA website.

For more about roadside checks and notices click here

Previous Public Inquiries

Any restriction and previous PI sanctions

For more about public inquiries click here

Transport Manager

Check credentials of TM alongside continouse development and controls

For more about duties of a Transport Manager click here

Vehicle Documentation

All releavant vehicle documentationa and plates present

There are a number of different types of documents that are required for HGVs in the UK. These include:

Driver's license: The driver of an HGV must have a valid driver's license that is appropriate for the type of vehicle they are driving.

Vehicle registration document: The HGV must have a valid vehicle registration document. This document shows who owns the vehicle and what type of vehicle it is.

Insurance certificate: The HGV must have valid insurance. This insurance covers the driver and the vehicle in the event of an accident.

Roadworthiness certificate: The HGV must have a valid roadworthiness certificate. This certificate shows that the vehicle is safe to drive on UK roads.

Operator's licence: If the HGV is being used for commercial purposes, the operator must have a valid operator's licence. This licence is issued by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA).

Load plan: If the HGV is carrying a load, the driver must have a load plan. This plan shows the weight and dimensions of the load, as well as the route that the HGV will be taking.

Dangerous goods documentation: If the HGV is carrying dangerous goods, the driver must have the appropriate documentation. This documentation shows the type of goods that are being carried, as well as the safety precautions that must be taken.

In addition to these documents, HGV drivers may also be required to carry other documents, such as a tachograph card or a vehicle excise duty (VED) disc.

Health & Safety

Review of the H&S Policy and Risk assessments

Here are some health and safety and risk assessments that an HGV freight business should have in place:

Driver training. Drivers should be trained in safe driving practices, including how to avoid accidents, how to handle hazardous materials, and how to deal with emergencies.

Vehicle maintenance. Vehicles should be regularly inspected and maintained to ensure they are in safe working condition.

Load security. Loads should be properly secured to prevent them from shifting or falling during transport.

Working environment. The workplace should be safe and free from hazards, such as slippery floors, uneven surfaces, and poor lighting.

Equipment safety. All equipment should be properly maintained and in good working order.

Personal protective equipment. Employees should be provided with the appropriate personal protective equipment, such as hard hats, safety glasses, and gloves.

Fire safety. The workplace should have adequate fire safety measures in place, such as fire extinguishers, fire alarms, and evacuation plans.

First aid. The workplace should have a first aid kit and someone trained in first aid.

Accident reporting. All accidents and injuries should be reported and investigated.

Risk assessments. Regular risk assessments should be carried out to identify and control hazards.

In addition to these general health and safety measures, there are also specific risks associated with the transportation of hazardous materials. HGV freight businesses that transport hazardous materials should have in place additional measures to protect their employees and the public, such as:

Training in the safe handling of hazardous materials

Proper labeling and packaging of hazardous materials

Strict procedures for loading and unloading hazardous materials

Regular inspections of vehicles and equipment used to transport hazardous materials

Emergency plans in place in case of a spill or accident involving hazardous materials

By taking these steps, HGV freight businesses can help to ensure the safety of their employees, the public, and the environment.

Human Resources

Company Handbook, contracts, disciplinary process, etc

The minimum requirements of a company with regards to HR/ER and their obligations in the UK are as follows:

Employment contracts - All employees must have a written employment contract that sets out the terms and conditions of their employment. This includes the job title, pay, hours of work, holiday entitlement, and notice period.

Payroll - Companies must keep accurate records of their employees' pay and hours worked. They must also pay their employees on time and in full.

Time off work- Employees are entitled to certain amounts of paid and unpaid time off work, including sick leave, maternity leave, and paternity leave. Companies must allow their employees to take this time off when they need it.

Health and safety - Companies must take reasonable steps to protect the health and safety of their employees. This includes providing a safe working environment, training employees on health and safety issues, and carrying out risk assessments.

Discrimination and harassment - Companies must not discriminate against their employees on the grounds of age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex, or sexual orientation. They must also take steps to prevent harassment of their employees.

Redundancy - If a company is making employees redundant, they must follow a fair and reasonable process. This includes consulting with employees and giving them notice of the redundancy.

Data protection - Companies must protect the personal data of their employees. This includes keeping data secure and only using it for legitimate purposes.

Records - Companies must keep certain records of their employees, such as their pay records, pension records, and health and safety records.

Training - Companies must provide their employees with appropriate training. This includes training on health and safety, discrimination and harassment, and data protection.

Records- Companies must keep certain records of their employees, such as their pay records, pension records, and health and safety records.

Companies that fail to comply with these obligations may be liable to pay fines or be taken to court/tribunal.

GDRP

How secure and compliant is the customer and colleague data in companys possession.

The UK General Data Protection Regulation (UK GDPR) is the UK's implementation of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (EU GDPR). The UK GDPR applies to all organisations that process personal data of individuals located in the UK, regardless of where the organisation is based.

The UK GDPR sets out a number of obligations for organisations that process personal data. These include the following:

Organisations must obtain consent from individuals before processing their personal data, unless there is another legal basis for processing the data.

Organisations must only process personal data for specified, explicit and legitimate purposes.

Organisations must only process personal data that is adequate, relevant and limited to what is necessary in relation to the purposes for which it is processed.

Organisations must keep personal data accurate and up to date.

Organisations must take appropriate security measures to protect personal data from unauthorised or unlawful processing, accidental loss, destruction or damage.

Organisations must provide individuals with access to their personal data and allow them to correct, erase or restrict the processing of their personal data.

Organisations must notify the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) of a personal data breach where it is likely to result in a high risk to the rights and freedoms of individuals.

The UK GDPR also sets out a number of rights for individuals, including the right to:

Request access to their personal data.

Request that their personal data be corrected or erased.

Object to the processing of their personal data.

Restrict the processing of their personal data.

Port their personal data to another organisation.

Not be subject to automated decision-making.

Organisations that fail to comply with the UK GDPR may be subject to a range of sanctions, including fines of up to £10 million or 4% of global turnover, whichever is greater.

The UK GDPR is a complex piece of legislation and organisations should seek professional advice to ensure compliance.

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